Parliament just slapped millions of disabled people in the face

A debate in parliament on Wednesday 5 June showed at best the lack of concern for millions of disabled people. At worst, it is a sign of the contempt hundreds of MPs hold their chronically ill constituents in.

Another day, another debate

A debate on invisible disabilities and access change happened in the House of Commons. It was about impairments that are not always visible in terms of their effects, and what can be done to raise more awareness of these.

Now, don’t misunderstand me. I am the partner of someone who lives with predominantly invisible disabilities and illnesses. So, I welcome any debate into the lives of chronically ill and disabled people and how government and society treats them.

Nic’s story

My girlfriend Nicola Jeffery is just one example of millions of people in the UK ravaged by chronic but often invisible diseases, illnesses and conditions. She currently lives with (yes, it’s gone up again since the last time I wrote):

  • Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS).
  • Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME).
  • Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS).
  • Craniocervical Instability (CCI).
  • Atlantoaxial Instability (AAI).
  • Hypotension.
  • Megaloblastic Anaemia.
  • Peripheral Neuropathy.
  • Chronotropic Incompetence.
  • T3 Hypothyroidism.
  • Mycotoxicosis.
  • Deformations in left foot, left leg shortness.
  • Non-epileptic focal aware and tonic clonic seizures.
  • Polycystic Ovary syndrome.
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMJ).

Nic is the perfect example of how invisible disabilities can severely debilitate someone’s life. She explained in her usual, eloquent but to-the-point manner in this Twitter thread. I suggest you read the whole thing:

In short, her treatment at the hands of government bodies, medical professionals and society more broadly has been disgusting.

But Nic’s story, which you can read here, is sadly like hundreds of thousands of other people across the world.

So, Wednesday’s debate was an opportunity for MPs to show their concern, understanding and wish for action to happen.

‘Rarely diagnosed’. Rarely debated.

As I tweeted, invisible disabilities are far from ‘rare’ in the UK. As Nic always says, they’re more ‘rarely diagnosed’:

Did MPs turn out in their droves?

Did they hell:

HoC Invisible Illnesses.png

Now, I know what you’re going to say.

All the white bits of paper on the benches are MPs who aren’t physically present but who wish to either vote or make it be known they support the debate. Ironically, they’re ‘invisible’ but still there.

This is not the point.

“Parasites”

As I previously wrote for The Canary, we’ve been here before. A UN committee accused successive UK governments of “grave” and “systematic” violations of disabled people’s human rights. It said they had caused a “human catastrophe”.

But the parliamentary debate into this was almost empty. As I wrote at the time:

empty seats… amplify the impression to the public that disabled people’s rights are a niche issue – one that doesn’t require the full attention of MPs – just a handful to show willing by the party… It gives the feeling that the “grave” and “systematic” violations of… 13.3 million disabled people’s human rights are not really that important…

 

The UN previously said there was a culture in UK society where disabled people were viewed as “parasites, living on social benefits… and [living on] the taxes of other people”. And by not bothering to take half an hour out of their day to sit and listen to a debate over one of the most serious issues in recent history… MPs merely add fuel to this fire.

The invisible disabilities debate was exactly this, with the usual exceptions.

Shout outs and shout downs

The ever-present and indefatigable Labour MP Debbie Abrahams has been a bastion of solidarity with disabled people, and was of course present. Sharon Hodgson and Justin Madders were also there, among others. The SNP’s Carol Monaghan and Angela Crawley were there, the latter making very good points about the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). Some Tories were present, with Justin Tomlinson representing the government.

But the lack of MPs once again gives the impression that they really don’t care that much. It’s an impression that for many of them is probably spot on. Disabled people, as the UN alluded to, are viewed by many MPs as a burden to be tolerated. They are people who should be kept in the most basic of living standards by the state (if at all) and otherwise forgotten about. Empty benches on this debate were of little surprise.

Underwhelming

Of course, the end result of the afternoon was as underwhelming as the turnout. As Nic tweeted:

Yup, that was just about it.

Forget breaking down the miseducation, prejudice and stigma that exists in the medical world over countless invisible disabilities like ME.

Don’t worry about the scandal of “Fabricated or Induced Illness” (FII) diagnoses, where the state removes children from their parents – often because their disabilities are invisible and bodies like social services think the mothers are making their children’s illnesses up.

Let’s not debate PACE trial – one of the biggest medical scandals of the 21st century that has left people living with ME, EDS, Fibromyalgia and other conditions effectively being told to ‘think themselves better’.

We won’t talk about the scandalously low levels of research funding into diseases like ME, either.

Nor will we mention the barely fit-for-purpose Equality Act 2010, that is even less fit-for-purpose for invisible disabilities.

And let’s ignore the entrenched misunderstanding, abuse and neglect that exists in the very fabric of our society just because people living with invisible disabilities look ‘normal’. From disbelief and accusations of lying to being kicked off accessible seats on buses. It’s there, and it’s not invisible.

Wednesday’s debate was just another example in a long line of parliamentary lip service to disabled people. I applaud the MPs who were present. But the woeful turnout and the limp conclusions offer nothing to millions of people in this country, whom society has thrown on its scrapheap.

I’ve given up writing full time to support my partner Nic, who lives with ME and nearly now 13 other diseases and illnesses. You can read about her journey here. Most of her medical treatment now has to be private; a challenge in itself with no income.

If you want to support us on this journey, or if you like my writing, any gifts/donations are gratefully accepted below. Thank you.
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2 comments

  1. Pingback: Parliament just slapped millions of disabled people in the face | Mr Topple | Tory Britain!
  2. Gordon Lawrence · 18 Days Ago

    I have had the same thing for years. IE I had an idiot use a nickel steel (standard medical steel) fixing set to sort out a broken ankle which has left me in legal terms unable to walk and surprise surprise my medical reccords went missing. I had a copy of all the hospital records so that little governmental wheeze did not work. Luckily I know enough about law and medicine and have the research skills to find proof to give to tribunals. That said I had 5 appeals going on simultaneously amongst other things and ended up trying to commit suicide three times according to one source (I have no idea I cant remember any of it). So I now have MDD Clinical Anxiety and PTSD to add to the physical problems thanks to the DWP. So I was someone that might have been able to return to work in some capacity but the DWP has messed with my head so much that now looks impossible.

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